About the Journal

The Trends in Family and Community Medicine is a peer-reviewed research journal to meet the needs of scientists, practitioners, policymakers, students and researchers and communities they serve. The journal is seeking to foster academic communication and interdisciplinary research among Community Medicine providers engaged in various forms.

This journal is dedicated to advancing knowledge essential to understanding and improving health and primary care. The Family and Community Medicine supports a learning community of those who generate and use information about health and generalist health care.

Aims and Scope

Trends in Family and Community Medicine invites physicians of first contact as well as other health providers to document reflections of their own practices and experience towards accumulation wealth of scientific evidence enriching Family Medicine. Journal of Family and Community medicine offers opportunity to private practitioners (solo and group practice), general duty medical officers, occupational physicians, medical officers & other national health programs, public health specialists as well as practitioners of allied health disciplines to publish their work.

Trends in Family and Community Medicine advocates academic institutionalization of community health services through accumulation of data and evidence on health interventions based at individual, family and community level. Journal also invites discussions and debates on evaluation of training programs, faculty development, curriculum standardization and development of practice standards and protocols.

Highlighted Topics

  • Behavioral Medicine
  • Environmental Health
  • Family and Public Nutrition
  • Family Health
  • Family Practice
  • Health Care Delivery
  • Health Planning
  • Health Policy
  • Communicable diseases
  • Behavioral health
  • Adolescent health
  • Public Health and Disability
  • Women's Healthcare
  • Reproductive health
  • Mental health education
  • Preventive medicine
  • Occupational medicine
  • Adolescent health
  • Community Medicine
  • Primary Care